The Academic Unit

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I. Entry-level degree programs in Career Counseling, School Counseling, and Student Affairs and College Counseling are comprised of approved graduate-level study with a minimum of 48 semester credit hours or 72 quarter credit hours required of all students. Entry-level degree programs in Addiction Counseling  and in Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling are comprised of approved graduate-level study with a minimum of 60 semester credit hours or 90 quarter credit hours required of all students.

Beginning July 1, 2009, all applicant programs in Clinical Mental Health Counseling must require a minimum of 54 semester credit hours or 81 quarter credit hours for all students. As of July 1, 2013, all applicant programs in Clinical Mental Health Counseling must require a minimum of 60 semester credit hours or 90 quarter credit hours for all students.

RESPONSE:The Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology has two programs that are relevant to this standard. The Master of Arts in Education in School Counseling is a 48 semester credit hour program.  The Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling is a 60 semester credit hour program. Both degree programs are comprised of graduate-level course work approved by the university. Each of these degrees are described in the Student Handbook under the section on Degrees and Programs.  You can also see the Admission and Advising Handbook on this website for specific planned programs.

J. The counselor education academic unit has made systematic efforts to attract, enroll, and retain a diverse group of students and to create and support an inclusive learning community.

RESPONSE:Within our Student Handbook, we note our department, college and university mission statement which all refer to a commitment to respecting diversity in its many forms.  The EKU Counselor Education Program views recruiting and retaining a diverse group or students from the rural areas of central, eastern, and southeastern Kentucky as well as Appalachia as a wholeas a major focus. We define the term diverse group broadly, including ethnic, racial, and cultural identities as well as in philosophies and points of view, gender identity, age differences, and the challenges associated with disabilities of various kinds.

 The university has made a substantial and systematic effort to provide a focus on diversity planning and recruitment.  This effort is led by the Associate Provost for Diversity Planning.  This office has and maintains overall plans for attracting, enrolling, and retaining a diverse group of students as well as a plan for diverse faculty retention and incentives.  These plans are available from this office at http://www.diversity.eku.edu/web10/programs.php

Currently, 11.45% of the counselor education student body consists of students of diverse cultural backgrounds.  This percentage was generated from a BANNER system report which created a list of all students in the College of Education identified by Program attached here which shows the self identified ethnicity.  Because it relies on self report by student and limits the definition of diversity to ethnic background, it is considered an underestimate of total cultural differences in the programs

Flexibility - Our courses are scheduled to meet the needs of a diverse non-traditional population. Most of our courses are scheduled in the evenings, many are online, and course scheduling patterns can accommodate those students who may need to complete their program in stages or on a part-time basis.

Affordability - Our graduate tuition is competitive with other institutions in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and is significantly less than many online programs offered by private and for-profit institutions.

Advertising – actively advertising that our program has a strong emphasis on diversity.  The program website and mission statement highlight diversity.

We recognized that one key to the success of recruiting and retaining diverse students is maintaining a diverse faculty.  Our tenure track faculty includes individuals with physical disabilities, differences in sexual orientation, and racial and ethnic differences.  The university supports racial minorities (specifically African American) with a faculty incentive program that provides $15,000 the first year, $10,000 the second and $5000 the third year to be split between the department and the faculty member.  The faculty portion is to be used by that faculty member to enhance their development and opportunities to become tenured and otherwise successful in their positions.  The department portion is to be used to enhance all faculty’s opportunity to experience and improve their diversity knowledge.  http://www.diversity.eku.edu/web10/programs.php

K. Admission decision recommendations are made by the academic unit’s selection committee and include consideration of the following:

  1. Each applicant’s potential success in forming effective and culturally relevant interpersonal relationships in individual and small-group contexts.

RESPONSE:Each student must provide a minimum of three references that address the student’s disposition, professionalism, career goals, and overall fit for the counseling program. The student also provides a resume of their work and educational history which includes their career goals. In addition, the student provides an extensive writing sample that is based on self reflection on a variety of effective counselor characteristics and cultural experiences which is evaluated to determine disposition and fit for the counseling program.  The full Admissions Process is outlined for students in the Admissions and Advising Handbook located on the web at http://coecounseling.eku.edu/admissions-and-advising-handbook.

2. Each applicant’s aptitude for graduate-level study.

RESPONSE:The Department Admissions Committee reviews completed student applications and makes decisions to admit students into the program. Admission occurs on a rolling basis and the Admissions Committee meets weekly during the academic year and as needed during the summer. The applicant must demonstrate academic knowledge through meeting the Graduate School requirements which includes completion of a Bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall or 2.75 on the last 60 hours. In addition, the department requires for the student to have at least a 3.0 overall undergraduate GPA or 3.0 on the last 60 hours. Or, if the student meets the Graduate School GPA requirement, but does not meet the department GPA requirement, they may show academic knowledge with a minimum score of 400 on either the Verbal or Quantitative section of the GRE or a minimum score of 375 on the MAT.  The full Admissions Process is outlined for students in the Admissions and Advising Handbook located on the web at http://coecounseling.eku.edu/admissions-and-advising-handbook.

3.Each applicant’s career goals and their relevance to the program.

RESPONSE: Each student must provide a minimum of three references that address the students disposition, professionalism, career goals, and overall fit for the counseling program. The student also provides a resume of their work and educational history which includes career goals and overall fit for the program. The student also provides a resume of their work and educational history which includes their career goals. In addition, the student provides an extensive writing sample that is based on self reflection on a variety of effective counselor characteristics and cultural experiences which is evaluated to determine disposition and fit for the counseling program.  The full Admissions Process is outlined for students in the Admissions and Advising Handbook located on the web at http://coecounseling.eku.edu/admissions-and-advising-handbook.

RESPONSE:(Summary) Each student must provide a minimum of three references that address the student’s disposition, professionalism, career goals, and overall fit for the counseling program. The student also provides a resume of their work and educational history which includes their career goals. In addition, the student provides an extensive writing sample that is based on self reflection on a variety of effective counselor characteristics and cultural experiences which is evaluated to determine disposition and fit for the counseling program

The Department Admissions Committee reviews completed student applications and makes decisions to admit students into the program. Admissions occur on a rolling basis and the Admissions Committee meets weekly during the academic year and as needed during the summer. The applicant must demonstrate academic knowledge through meeting the Graduate School requirements which includes completion of a Bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall or 2.75 on the last 60 hours. In addition, the department requires for the student to have at least a 3.0 overall undergraduate GPA or 3.0 on the last 60 hours. Or, if the student meets the Graduate School GPA requirement, but does not meet the department GPA requirement, they may show academic knowledge with a minimum score of 400 on either the Verbal or Quantitative section of the GRE or a minimum score of 375 on the MAT.

Each student must provide a minimum of three references that address the student’s disposition, professionalism, career goals, and overall fit for the counseling program. The student also provides a resume of their work and educational history which includes career goals and overall fit for the program

L. Before or at the beginning of the first term of enrollment in the academic unit, the following should occur for all new students:

  1. A new student orientation is conducted.

RESPONSE:Perspective and new students have information about the program prior to applying for admission through the Department website (http://coecounseling.eku.edu). Information provided in the Admission and Advising Handbook (http://coecounseling.eku.edu/admissions-and-advising-handbook) which includes a general advising letter, curriculum contracts for the degrees, and documents titled, “Steps to Admission, Practicum/Internship, Graduation, Certification/Licensure”. In addition perspective and new students are encouraged to contact faculty and/or the department chair for any additional information they might need prior to being admitted.

After the new student is admitted, the department conducts the student orientation during the COU 813 Professional Orientation and Ethics  class which is the first counseling class taken. During the professional orientation portion of the class, students are provided information on an orientation to the discipline of counseling as well as the department counseling programs. The departmentand professional association websites(KCA website, EPSB website, KBLPC Board Site, ACA website, AMHCA website, ASCA website, NBCC websiteand CACREP website) provide the basis for this new student orientation. The student signs an agreement form at the end of the COU 813 class indicating that they have read and understand all of the information provided in the department handbooks and various information provided on the department website.

2. A student handbook is disseminated that included the following:

   a. mission statement of the academic unit and program objectives; 

RESPONSE:The Counseling and Educational Psychology Department has developed a Student Handbook that is posted on the web and required reading in the first course in the program. 

This handbook includes the following mission statement:

The mission of the Counseling and Educational Psychology Department, at Eastern Kentucky University is to prepare effective professional counselors who will lead productive, responsible and enriched lives.  

They will accomplish this by learning to become critical and creative thinkers who can communicate effectively and who have the knowledge, pedagogy, dispositions, technology skills and respect for diversity needed to succeed as professional counselors.  These skills and attributes will be learned through a program that is designed around national and state standards, including those of the Council for Accreditation on Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB), and the Kentucky Board for Licensed Professional Counselors (KBLPC). 

The Counseling and Educational Psychology faculty place priority on the application aspect of counseling. Each student is expected to be knowledgeable of counseling theories, intervention techniques, research skills, and to be committed to their own personal growth

Additionally, the student handbook also lists the following overall and specific program objectives:

Overall Objectives:

  • To acquire a theoretical knowledge base from which individual counseling styles can be derived.
  • To become aware of ethical and legal issues concerning counselors.
  • To develop basic and advanced individual counseling skills.
  • To become an effective group facilitator.
  • To develop an awareness and respect of cultural differences, and be able to apply this to the counseling professions.
  • To experience personal growth and a heightened sense of self-awareness.
  • To understand research, assessment and evaluation procedures.
  •  To learn effective professional communication skills

Specific Objectives for School and Mental Health Counseling include: (From CACREP):

                            Professional Identity

  • history and philosophy of the counseling profession, including significant factors and events;
  • professional roles, functions, and relationships with other human service providers;
  • technological competence and computer literacy; professional organizations, primarily ACA, its divisions, branches, and affiliates, including membership benefits, activities, services to members, and current emphases; professional credentialing, including certification, licensure, and accreditation practices and standards, and the effects of public policy on these issues;
  • public and private policy processes, including the role of the professional counselor in advocating on behalf of the profession;
  • advocacy processes needed to address institutional and social barriers that impede access, equity, and success for clients; and ethical standards of ACA and related entities, and applications of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling.

Social and Cultural Diversity

  • Multicultural and pluralistic trends, including characteristics and concerns between and within    diverse groups
  • Attitudes, beliefs, understandings and acculturative experiences, including specific experiential learning activities
  • Individual, couple, family, group and community strategies for working with diverse populations and ethnic groups
  • Counselors’ roles in social justice, advocacy and conflict resolution, cultural self-awareness, the nature of biases, prejudices, processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination, and other culturally supported behaviors that are detrimental to the growth of the human spirit, mind, or body;
  • Theories of multicultural counseling, theories of identity development, and multicultural competencies; and
  • Ethical and legal considerations.

Human Growth and Development

  • Theories of individual and family development and transitions across life-span
  • Theories of learning and personality development
  • Human behavior including an understanding of developmental crises, disability, exceptional behavior, addictive behavior, psychopathology, and situational and environmental factors that affect both normal and abnormal behavior; strategies for facilitating optimum development over the life-span; and ethical and legal considerations

Career Development

  • Career development theories and decision-making models
  • Career, vocational, educational, occupational and labor market information resources, visual and print media, computer-based career information systems, and other electronic career information systems;Career development program planning, organization, implementation, administration, and evaluation
  • Interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles and factors, including the role of diversity and gender in career development
  • Career and educational planning, placement, follow-up, and evaluation
  • Assessment instruments and techniques that are relevant to career planning and decision making
  • Technology-based career development applications and strategies, including computer-assisted career guidance and information systems and appropriate world-wide sites
  • Career counseling processes, techniques, and resources
  • Ethical and legal considerations

Helping Relationships

  • Counselor and consultant characteristics and behaviors that influence helping processes including age, gender, and ethnic differences, verbal and nonverbal behaviors and personal characteristics, orientations, and skills
  • An understanding of essential interviewing and counseling skills so that the student is able to develop a therapeutic relationship, establish appropriate counseling goals, design intervention strategies, evaluate client outcome, and successfully terminate the counselor-client relationship. Studies will also facilitate student self-awareness so that the counselor-client relationship is therapeutic and the counselor maintains appropriate professional boundaries;
  • Counseling theories that provide the student with a consistent model(s) to conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions. Student experiences will include an examination of the historical development of counseling theories,
  • an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case studies. Students will also be exposed to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice in the field so that they can begin to develop a personal model of counseling;
  • a systems perspective that provides an understanding of family and other systems theories and major models of family and related interventions. Students will be exposed to a rationale for selecting family and other systems theories as appropriate modalities for  family assessment and counseling;
  • A general framework for understanding and practicing consultation. Student experiences will include an examination of the historical development of consultation, an exploration of the stages of consultation and the major models of consultation, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case presentations. Students will begin to develop a personal model of consultation;
  • integration of technological strategies and applications within counseling and consultation processes and Ethical and legal considerations

Group Counseling

  • Principles of group dynamics, including group process components, developmental stage theories, group members’ roles and behaviors, and therapeutic factors of group work
  • Group leadership styles and approaches, including characteristics of various types of group leaders and leadership styles; Theories of group counseling, including commonalties, distinguishing characteristics, and pertinent research and literature;
  • Group counseling methods, including group counselor orientations and behaviors, appropriate selection criteria and methods, and methods of evaluation of effectiveness;
  • Approaches used for other types of group work, including task groups, psycho educational groups, and therapy groups;
  • Professional preparation standards for group leaders; Ethical and legal considerations

Assessment

  • Historical perspectives concerning the nature and meaning of assessment;
  • Basic concepts of standardized and non-standardized testing and other assessment techniques including norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment, environmental assessment, performance assessment, individual and group test and inventory methods, behavioral observations, and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods;
  • statistical concepts, including scales of measurement, measures of central tendency, indices of variability, shapes and types of distributions, and correlations;
  • Reliability (i.e., theory of measurement error, models of reliability, and the use of reliability information);
  • Validity (i.e., evidence of validity, types of validity, and the relationship between reliability and validity
  • Age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, language, disability, culture, spirituality, and other factors related to the assessment and evaluation of individuals, groups, and specific populations;
  • Strategies for selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling;
  • An understanding of general principles and methods of case conceptualization, assessment, and/or diagnoses of mental and emotional status;
  • ethical and legal considerations

Research and Program Evaluation

  • The importance of research and opportunities and difficulties in

conducting research in the counseling profession,

  • Research methods such as qualitative, quantitative, single-case

designs, action research, and outcome-based research;

  • Use of technology and statistical methods in conducting research

and program evaluation, assuming basic computer literacy;

  • Principles, models, and applications of needs assessment,

program evaluation, and use of findings to effect program

modifications;

  • Use of research to improve counseling effectiveness;
  • Ethical and legal considerations

b. information about appropriate professional organizations, opportunities for professional involvement, and activities potentially appropriate for students;

RESPONSE:Information about involvement and opportunities in professional organizations takes place in a number of courses beginning with Professional Orientation and Ethics (COU 813 ).Additionally, students are encouraged and often have the opportunity to present at state and national conferences with faculty members. 

Within the Student Handbook, the program describes that it is designed around national and state standards, including those of the Council for Accreditation on Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB), and the Kentucky Board for Licensed Professional Counselors (KBLPC).  In addition, the handbook notes that the Counselor Education faculty subscribe to the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Code of Ethics and Standards of Practiceas the ethical code governing the professional behavior of students and faculty members. In addition, the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Code of Ethicshas been adopted for school counselor candidates; the American Mental Health Counselor Association (AMHCA) Code of Ethicshas been adopted for mental health counselor candidates.  Finally, the section below is excerpted from our student handbook:

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

To enhance graduate education and set the foundation for full participation in the counseling profession, it is strongly recommended that all graduate students become members of the professional organizations or associations, which represent their area(s) of special interest. Most professional organizations offer reduced membership rates to students. Typically, students are required to obtain a faculty signature verifying student status in order to receive a student rate when joining any of these organizations.

Because we realize that financial resources are limited, students are NOT REQUIRED to become a member of one or more professional organizations. However, membership in a professional organization is an important aspect of professionalism, and therefore, students are STRONGLY ENCOURAGED to join one or more of those professional organizations.

Benefits of membership may include:

  • Receipt of professional publications (journals and newsletters) published by the organization and divisions in which membership is held.
  • Reduced registration fees for professional meetings (seminars, conventions, workshops) sponsored by the organization.
  • Eligibility for member services (library resource use, legal defense funds and services, group liability insurance).
  • Involvement with activities and issues, which are directly or indirectly pertinent to their profession (legislation and professional credentialing, including licensure, certification and program accreditation).
  • Affiliation with other professionals having interests and areas of expertise similar to their own.

Most professional organizations have both state and national affiliations. Students may join one without joining the other in most cases. Divisions within the professional organizations serve specific areas of interest (e.g., marriage and family counseling, mental health counseling, or school counseling). These divisions can usually only be joined if one already belongs to the parent organization (usually at a small additional cost).

Students will be given applications to join the American Counseling Association (ACA) and the Kentucky Counseling Association (KCA) in COU 813.  Applications are also available on each organization’s websites. Most of our faculty are members of numerous professional organizations such as ACA and or KCA. Some hold offices in the professional organizations or are on boards and committees of these organizations.

Other Information

PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION

School counselors in Kentucky may become certified by the Kentucky Education Professions Standards Board through guidelines developed by the KY Department of Education. Mental Health Counselors (and school counselors with 60 appropriate graduate hours) may become Licensed Professional Counseling Associates (LPCA) or Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors in the state of Kentucky. The Certified Professional Counselor (CPC) law has been in effect since 1996 and in 2002 the state legislature approved licensure for counselors, thus changing the CPC to LPCC. In the same legislative session, LPCC’s were given the opportunity to become Qualified Mental Health Providers or QMHP’s.

Additional information may be found by visiting thehttp://lpc.ky.gov/website or the http://www.kyepsb.net/.  Additional information is provided in Suggested Steps Certification and Licensure document

CHI SIGMA IOTA – Counseling Honor Society

The Counseling and Educational Psychology unit at Eastern Kentucky University has a local chapter of Chi Sigma Iota(Epsilon Kappa Upsilon), the Counseling Academic and Professional Honor Society International.The Epsilon Kappa UpsilonChapter participates in community service activities and holds special events for counseling students. Applications for membership can be obtained on the web at www.csi-net.org  Eligibility criteria include completing at least 12 hours in the counseling program and a 3.50 graduate GPA.

c.written endorsement policy explaining the procedures for recommending students for credentialing and employment 

RESPONSE: The Written Endorsement Policy Included in the Student Handbook in the section titled “Other Information” states: If the student has been successful in earning his or her degree, the department recommends School Counselors for certification in school counseling with the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board and Mental Health Counselors for licensure by the Kentucky Board for Professional Counselors. The Mental Health counseling program has been approved by the Kentucky Board for Professional Counselors for meeting part of the licensure requirement for a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. Students are evaluated individually by faculty on a case by case basis for additional recommendations (such as employment, scholarships, honors, doctoral programs) based on the student’s level of knowledge, skills, and dispositions/professionalism.

d. student retention policy explaining procedures for student remediation and/or dismissal from the program; and

RESPONSE: The response to this item is excerpted from the Student Monitoring Procedures outlined in the Student Handbook. Students are expected to conduct themselves in an ethical, responsible and professional manner. As trainers of student counselors, the faculty of Eastern Kentucky University (EKU) expects our students to be concerned about other people, to be stable and psychologically well-adjusted, to be effective in interpersonal relationships, and to be able to receive and give constructive feedback. Further, we expect the student to be committed to personal growth and professional development through opportunities such as those provided in course work, group labs, supervision, self-selected readings, and personal counseling. The EKU faculty believes that it is ethically imperative that counselors be willing to do in their own lives what they ask their clients to do.

EKU faculty believe a component of their responsibility to the student, the profession, and the eventual consumers of services provided by EKU graduates, is the necessity to monitor not only students' academic progress but also students' personal and professional characteristics that will affect their performance in the field. These characteristics should be of a quality as to NOT interfere with the professionalism or helping capacity of the student.

All students in training are subject to review each semester by all faculty members. Students receiving a "C" or below in any course may be asked to repeat the course and or complete additional remediation.  Students who receive a D of F in any course or a "U" in Practicum or Internship will be required to retake the course and will be required to complete remedial work. Students are reviewed based upon the characteristics listed on the Professional Counselor Performance Evaluation Form (PCPE) (Copy included below).

Student’s progress is discussed each semester by the Clinical Review Committee.  If a student's knowledge, skill or characteristics is found lacking as rated on the PCPE scale as 0 (0 - Does not meet criteria for program level), the following process will be followed:

The student will be presented with a copy of the PCPE form and the professor's comments. A copy of the form is also given to the faculty in the Clinical Review Committee and discussed in their next meeting. After the committee discussion, one of the following steps will be taken depending on the nature and severity of the Clinical Committees concerns:

a) The student and the professor will meet to discuss the form and any recommended remediation deemed appropriate,

b) The student will be required to meet with his or her advisor and at least one other faculty member to discuss remediation or possible reconsideration of continuation in the program,

c) If the committee determines that the student's personal or professional behavior is inappropriate to the field of counseling, and such behaviors would be a detriment in working with others, the student will be denied continuance in the EKU program.

Policies for review of students during Practicum and Internship include the above criteria as well as additional criteria appropriate to the clinical experience. Information concerning this process is included in your Practicum/Internship Handbook on the Counseling and Educational Psychology website.

Possible Referral for Personal Counseling

Please note that in addition to the other requirements stated above, that the Clinical Review Committee may request or require that a student seek their own personal counseling to address issues they feel are keeping them from being as effective as they should be and this may be a condition of continuing in the program.  This is outlined in the Agreement Contract all students must complete in COU 813 and a copy of this is included below.

In addition to the ongoing review described above, a specific review of all students will be completed by the instructor of the following courses identified as critical evaluative points in the program.  These are:

COU 813________ student must have turned in a signed agreement contract (copied below for reference)

COU 846________ faculty member must have completed a PCPE form on each student (follows below)

COU 820________ faculty member must have completed a PCPE form on each student (follows below)

COU 880________ faculty member must have completed a PCPE form on each student (follows below)

COU 881________ faculty member must have completed a PCPE form on each student (follows below)

Any failure to meet the expected level of performance (failure to turn in Agreement Contract or score of 0 on the PCPE form) will result in referral to the Clinical Review Committee and will be asked to meet with faculty to discuss remediation or possible reconsideration of continuation in the program.

The Counseling and Educational Psychology Department also follows all policies and procedures outlined in the University Student Handbook (http://www.studentaffairs.eku.edu/studenthandbook/) including but not limited to policies on academic integrity and grade appeals policies.  Students should review these first if they have any questions about policies or procedures.


Agreement Contract

 (To be completed during first semester of program)

I,_____________________________________________________ (Please Print Name)

have accessed a copy of the Student Handbook for the Counseling and Educational Psychology program at Eastern Kentucky University. I have read, understand, and agree to abide by the policies, and fulfill the requirements stated forth therein. I further agree that the Counselor Education Faculty of Eastern Kentucky University has the right and responsibility to monitor my academic progress, my professional and ethical behavior, and my personal counselor characteristics as they relate to competency as a counselor. 

I understand that if in the judgment of the Counselor Education Faculty of Eastern Kentucky University, my academic progress, professional and ethical behavior, and personal characteristics relative to competency as a counselor are in question, I may be subject to remediation or removal from the program.  They also may request or require I seek my own personal counseling to address issues they feel are keeping me from being as effective as I should be and this may be a condition of continuing in the program. 

Signature of Student _____________________________ Date__________________

Please complete your Planned Program with your Advisor by the end of your second semester in the program.

Both the agreement and your Planned Program will be placed in your student file and you should also keep a copy of both.

 


 

Professional Counseling Performance Evaluation

PLEASE PRINT

Student: _____________________________       Student ID #: ____________________

Semester & Yr: ____________________     Course #:____________

Faculty :_______________________________

 

                                                          Rating Scale

N - No Opportunity to observe                               1 –Meets criteria minimally or inconsistently for program level

 

0 - Does not meet criteria for program level           2 –Meets criteria consistently at this program level

Communication Skills and Abilities

 

 

 

 

1.   The student demonstrates the ability to establish relationships in such a manner that a working alliance can be created.

N

0

1

2

2.   The student demonstrates effective communication skills including:

N

0

1

2

      a. Creating appropriate structure –setting the boundaries of the helping frame and maintaining boundaries  throughout the work such as setting parameters for meeting time and place, maintaining the time limits, etc.

N

0

1

2

      b. Understanding content –understanding the primary elements of the client’s story.

N

0

1

2

      c. Understanding context –understanding the uniqueness of the story elements and their underlying meanings.

N

0

1

2

      d. Responding to feelings –identifying affect and addressing those feelings in an therapeutic manner.

N

0

1

2

      e. Congruence –genuineness; external behavior consistent with internal affect.

N

0

1

2

      f. Establishing and communicating empathy –taking the perspective of the individual without over identifying, and communicating this experience to the individual.

N

0

1

2

      g. Non-verbal communication –demonstrates effective used of head, eyes, hands, feet, posture, voice, attire, 

          etc.

N

0

1

2

      h. Immediacy –communicating by staying in the here and now.

N

0

1

2

      i. Timing –responding at the optimal moment.

N

0

1

2

      j. Intentionality –responding with a clear understanding of the therapist’s therapeutic intention.

N

0

1

2

      k. Self-disclosure –skillful and carefully –considered for a specific strategic purpose.

N

0

1

2

3.  The student demonstrates awareness of power differences in therapeutic relationship and manages thesedifferences effectively.

N

0

1

2

4.  The student collaborates with an individual to establish clear therapeutic goals.

N

0

1

2

5.  The student facilitates movement toward the individual’s goals.

N

0

1

2

6.  The student demonstrates the capacity to match appropriate interventions to the presenting problem in aconsistent manner.

N

0

1

2

7.   The student creates a safe environment.

N

0

1

2

Professional Responsibility

 

 

 

 

1.    The student conducts self in an ethical manner so as to promote confidence in the counseling profession.

N

0

1

2

2.    The student relates to peers, professors, and others in a manner consistent with stated professional standards.

N

0

1

2

3.    The student demonstrates sensitivity to real and ascribed differences in power between themselves and others,and does not exploit or mislead other people during or after professional relationships.

N

0

1

2

4.    The student demonstrates application of legal requirements relevant to counseling training and practice.

N

0

1

2

Competence

 

 

 

 

 1.   The student recognizes the boundaries of her/his particular competencies and the limitations of her/his  expertise.

N

0

1

2

2.    The student takes responsibility for compensating for her/his deficiencies.

N

0

1

2

3. The student takes responsibility for assuring other’s welfare when encountering the boundaries of her/his

expertise.

N

0

1

2

4.    The student provides only those services and applies only those techniques for which she/he is qualified by

education, training and experience.

N

0

1

2

5.    The student demonstrates basic cognitive, affective, sensory, and motor capacities to respond to others.

N

0

1

2

Maturity

 

 

 

 

1.    The student demonstrates appropriate self-control (such as anger control, impulse control) in interpersonal

relationships with faculty, peers, and others.

N

0

1

2

2.    The student demonstrates honesty, fairness, and respect for others

N

0

1

2

3.    The student demonstrates an awareness of his/her own belief systems, values, needs and limitations and the

effect of these on his/her work.

N

0

1

2

4.    The student demonstrates the ability to receive, integrate and utilize feedback from peers, teachers and

        Supervisors

N

0

1

2

5.   The student exhibits appropriate levels of self-assurance, confidence, and trust in own ability.

N

0

1

2

6.   The student follows professionally recognized conflict resolution processes, seeking to informally address the

issue first with the individual(s) with whom the conflict exists.

N

0

1

2

Integrity

 

 

 

 

1.    The student refrains from making statements which are false, misleading or deceptive.

N

0

1

2

2.    The student avoids improper and potentially harmful dual relationships.

N

0

1

2

3.    The student respects the fundamental rights, dignity and worth of all people.

N

0

1

2

4.    The student respects the rights of individuals to privacy, confidentiality, and choices regarding self   

determination and autonomy.

N

0

1

2

5.    The student respects cultural, individual, and role differences, including those due to age, gender, race,

ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, language, and socioeconomic status.

N

0

1

2

COMMENTS:

____________________________________________                                     _____________________________________               

 

Student Signature Date                                                                                                Faculty Signature Date

 

Kerl B. S., Garcia L. J., McCullough S. C., & Maxwell E. M.. (2002). Systematic evaluation of professional

performance: Legally supported procedure and process.Counselor Education & Supervision, 41, 321-334.

  • e. academic appeal policy.

RESPONSE:The Counseling and Educational Psychology Department also follows all policies and procedures outlined in the University Student Handbook (http://www.studentaffairs.eku.edu/studenthandbook/) including but not limited to policies on academic integrity and grade appeals policies.  Students should review these first if they have any questions about policies or procedures.

 

M. For calendar year, the number of credit hours delivered by noncore faculty must not exceed the number of credit hours delivered by core faculty.

RESPONSE:Data has been collected and summarized below in a table showing the percentage of courses taught by full time faculty assigned to the programs vs. the percentage of classes taught by noncore (adjunct or affiliate) faculty.  As you look at this table, you will see that in no semester did this percentage of courses taught by noncore faculty exceed 37%.  This data was gathered from the Enrolment Data collected and linked herefor the semesters listed in the table. 

Semester and Year

*Total Courses Offered by Department

Percentage Taught by Core Faculty

Percentage Taught by Noncore Faculty

Spring 2011

30 classes

67%

33%

Fall 2010

31 classes

65%

35%

Spring 2010

35 classes

63%

37%

Fall 2009

32 classes

65%

35%

Spring 2009

34 classes

68%

32%

Fall 2008

31classes

71%

28%

*all courses listed above are 3 credit hour courses

N. Institutional data reflect that the ratio of full-time equivalent (FTE) students to FTE faculty should not exceed 10:1.

RESPONSE:Data on enrollment for the last three years were collected and analyzed to generate faculty to student ratios.  This data was pulled from actual screen shots of final registrations for course offerings for each semester.  These screen shots are included as exhibits for this item and can be linked to here. (Enrollment Data 2008-2011)  We used a formula to calculate the ratios using a nine hour teaching load per semester to equal one faculty FTE equivalent and a 12 hour student load per semester to equal one student FTE equivalent.  Please note the one to three COU courses each semester that were a part of only the Human Services degree program also offered in the department were not included in the student hour calculations and the faculty teaching these courses so do not teach in the school or mental health counseling programs so were also not included.  The summarized results of these findings are included below.  We are committed to the 1:10 ratio and closely monitor it each semester.  We feel the variation shown in the table is evidence of this and is well within the limits specified in the standard. 

Semester and Year

Calculated Faculty FTE to Student FTE Ratio

Spring 2011

11.25

Fall 2010

9.49

Spring 2010

10.73

Fall 2009

11.03

Spring 2009

11.45

Fall 2008

11.18

 

O. Students have an assigned faculty advisor at all times during enrollment in the program. Students, with their faculty advisor, develop a planned program of study within the first 12 months of graduate study.

RESPONSE:Each student in a program in the Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology receives a faculty advisor at the time of admission.  This advisor is assigned to the student by the chair and this information is passed to the graduate school who keeps a list of what advisor is assigned to what student.  Also at the time of admission the student receives a letter telling them who their advisor is and a separate letter giving them basic advising information (http://coecounseling.eku.edu/sites/coecounseling.eku.edu/files/files/admissions_hb/AdvisingLetter.pdf).  A planned program of study is also included in this mailing (http://coecounseling.eku.edu/admissions-and-advising-handbook).  The university is in the process of implementing a web based curriculum planning process for all students but graduate programs are not yet accurate.  This program is called DegreeWorks (https://degreeworks.eku.edu/).

P. The program faculty conducts a systematic developmental assessment of each student’s progress throughout the program, including consideration of the student’s academic performance, professional development, and personal development. Consistent with established institutional due process policy and the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) code of ethics and other relevant codes of ethics and standards or practice, if evaluations indicate that a student is not appropriate for the program, faculty members help facilitate the student’s transition out of the program and, if possible, into a more appropriate area of study.

RESPONSE:The Counseling and Educational Psychology Department has developed a Comprehensive Student Monitoring Process and this is defined in detail in the Student Handbook.  This is also explained above in I. L.2.d. 

Q. The practicum and internship experiences are tutorial forms of instruction; therefore, when individual and/or triadic supervision is provide by program faculty, the ratio of six students to one faculty member is considered equivalent to the teaching of one 3-semester-hour course. Such a ratio is considered maximum per course.

RESPONSE:During practicum class (COU 880 ), individual supervision is provided by either full-time or adjunct faculty. Enrollment for practicum class is limited to six students per class and internship is limited to 12 students per section. During internship class (COU 881), individual supervision is provided by site supervisors and group supervision by program faculty. Site supervisors meet the qualifications for CACREP site supervisors as documented in Section III of the self-study.  Each instructor who teaches a section of either practicum or internship is given a 3 credit hour load rating.  A list of practicum and internship enrollments for the last three spring and fall semesters are linked hereas taken from screen shots of the university online catalogue which shows that we maintained the specified ration for these classes and that faculty were assigned three credit hour loads for each (P & I 2008-2011).  Internship sections are registered for by students according to their site type (Elementary School, Secondary School or Mental Health Setting) and, because of this, an occasional section of internship class may show more than 12 students in a section but students are moved within these sections to keep the average student to instructor ration 12 or less.  The actual summary of the data on these sheets are included in the table below.

Semester and Year

COU 880 Mean Ratio

COU881Mean Ratio

Spring 2011

5.0

12.3

Fall 2010

6.0

11.0

Spring 2010

7.66

10.0

Fall 2009

6.0

10.3

Spring 2009

6.25

13.6

Fall 2008

5.66

11.3

Average Ratio for All

6.09

11.41

 

R. Group supervision for practicum and internship should not exceed 12 students.

RESPONSE:During practicum class (COU 880 ), individual supervision is provided by either full-time or adjunct faculty. Enrollment for practicum class is limited to six students per class and internship is limited to 12 students per section. During internship class (COU 881), individual supervision is provided by site supervisors and group supervision by program faculty. Site supervisors meet the qualifications for CACREP site supervisors as documented in Section III of the self-study.  Each instructor who teaches a section of either practicum or internship is given a 3 credit hour load rating.  A list of practicum and internship enrollments for the last three spring and fall semesters are linked hereas taken from screen shots of the university online catalogue which shows that we maintained the specified ration for these classes and that faculty were assigned three credit hour loads for each (P & I 2005-2008). Internship sections are registered for by students according to their site type (Elementary School, Secondary School or Mental Health Setting) and, because of this, an occasional section of internship class may show more than 12 students in a section but students are moved within these sections to keep the average student to instructor ration 12 or less.  The actual summary of the data on these sheets are included in the table below.

Semester and Year

COU 880 Mean Ratio

COU881Mean Ratio

Spring 2011

5.0

12.3

Fall 2010

6.0

11.0

Spring 2010

7.66

10.0

Fall 2009

6.0

10.3

Spring 2009

6.25

13.6

Fall 2008

5.66

11.3

Average Ratio for All

6.09

11.41

 

S. Programs provide evidence that students are covered by professional liability insurance while enrolled or participating in practicum, internship, or other field experiences.

RESPONSE:Students in all clinical experience courses are required to have liability insurance as described in the Practicum and Internship Handbook (http://coecounseling.eku.edu/practicum-and-internship-handbook) and on the front page of the Department website (http://www.education.eku.edu/CEP/important_info.php). Verification of the student’s insurance coverage is placed in each student’s file.

T. Opportunities for graduate assistantships for program students are commensurate with graduate assistantship opportunities in other clinical training programs in the institution.

RESPONSE:All graduate students who meet the graduate schools stated qualifications (http://gradschool.eku.edu/assistantships-awards) may apply for graduate assistantships as they become available in the department, college and throughout the university.  The Counseling and Educational Psychology department has traditionally had two graduate assistants to assist faculty and the chair with research.  The allocation of graduate assistantships for the 2010-2011 academic yearwithin the college are copied below from what was supplied to department chairs:

2011-2012 GA Position requests

We had a total of 23 positions for this past year and we have that number (23) again for 2011-2012.   This is the list established for this year for discussion based on last year’s allocations.  Please note that this is for GA positions and that GAs should not be doing clerical work for offices that could be done by a student worker.  They should be working with faculty as much as possible doing research or other tasks relevant to their field of study.  If they fill support roles for faculty it should be higher level support tasks than would be asked of student workers.   Please note that if you have a GA position in a grant or you wish to request a GA out of college funds you must follow the new guidelines on salaries and make decisions about tuition reimbursements per the new rules from graduate School.

Dean Office-2 Assigned with 1 of these to assist with Ed Leadership/CERA tasks

Technology office-3 Assigned and 1 of these will assist the Tech Coor for Model

Model- Assign 2 plus I from the COE Tech office will assist with Tech.

Erickson-1-Assigned 1

The Office of Professional Lab Experiences- None assigned specifically to this office but 4 assigned to C & I with at least 1 of these made available to assist this office

Ed Leadership- 4 assigned with assistance from 1 assigned from the Deans Office

C & I -Assigned 4 with at least one of these available to assist with the Professional Lab Experiences office

SED - Assigned 4

ASLIE and CODHL-Assigned 1

Counseling- Assigned 2

Total available for COE 2010-2011 = 23

In addition, students may be hired for graduate assistantships from funds provided through grants or other initiatives and the counseling students have received equal access to these position.  The university community has also hired counseling students as graduate assistants in appropriate settings within the university as a whole such as in various student affairs areas.